People in Texas who are part of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program or who are eligible for it might face more confusion as the efforts of the Trump administration to end the program continue. DACA was established in 2012 and allows some people who came to the United States as undocumented children to remain in the country and work. The Supreme Court ruled against terminating the program in June.

Homeland Security announces changes

However, the acting Homeland Security Secretary issued a memo saying that the program cannot take new applicants and that renewals would be for just one year instead of two. Immigration advocates say this flies in the face of the Supreme Court ruling and only creates more confusion and delay for people already in a stressful situation.

Immigrants and advocates respond

On Aug. 28, an immigrant advocacy organization and DACA participants filed an amended complaint arguing that the efforts of the Trump administration should be blocked. The complaint was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York as part of an ongoing case there. An amended complaint was also filed on the same day by attorneys general in the District of Columbia and 16 states. That complaint says that putting an end to the program causes damage to economies, schools and residents.

People who have questions about the DACA program, getting green cards, becoming a naturalized citizen or other aspects of immigration might want to contact an attorney. As the controversy over DACA illustrates, immigration law is fast-changing as well as complex. An attorney may help ensure that a client has the most recent information. An attorney may also be able to assist with paperwork and in determining the quickest path to a green card if the client is eligible under multiple criteria.