Obtaining a work visa and citizenship in the United States can be a great opportunity. However, if you are not careful and commit a crime, you could have your visa taken away from you and get deported.

Criminal convictions are the most common reason immigrants are deported from the country. If you are convicted of a crime of moral turpitude or a felony, you might be at risk of getting deported.

What is a crime of moral turpitude (CMT)?

Generally, crimes of moral turpitude are those that involve direct intent to cause harm to a person or thing. Some examples of crimes of moral turpitude are:

  • Murder or manslaughter
  • Sex offenses
  • DUI
  • Theft
  • Drug crimes

Each state has different rules on what they consider a CMT to be. If you are unsure if the crime you committed was a crime of moral turpitude, you might want to speak with an attorney to get a better understanding.

When could a crime of moral turpitude get you deported?

Committing a CMT could result in deportation if:

  • You committed a CMT within the first five years of immigrating to the United States
  • You committed two or more CMTs, not resulting from the same incident

If you immigrated to the United States and are now facing charges for committing a CMT, speaking with a knowledgeable immigration attorney may be in your best interest. They will understand CMT’s and can fight for you in court.